Hello Guest

Ethernet output

  • 10 Replies
  • 4278 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

*

Keith D

  • *
  • 1130
Ethernet output
« on: November 30, 2009, 10:07:28 PM »
Well someone has to ask a dumb question
may as well be me

i see from the picture of the rear of unit there is only an Ethernet output

so what do i do with that ??
the e-net connection i have is connected to my wired router

can i connect the unit to my network via the router and get connection to unit that way
or do i need a PCI board with an ethernet connection which i think i have somewhere already from way back

as  a last can you power up the unit thru an e-net connection ??

as you can tell i havent got the SBS1E

cheers

K/

*

max

Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2009, 10:26:22 PM »
It's a USB connector.  They plan on having a USB to TCP in the future.

*

VK2GEL

Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2009, 08:34:40 AM »
Please may I have ethernet on the new box?

I specialise in remote unattended sites, and PC's are just too unreliable in such places.

Ethernet enables me to route data over the net without the need for an onsite PC.

Thanks. 

*

Truetrack

Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2009, 08:27:55 PM »

It is my guess that there is only a minority of customers who have an ideal antenna location and who do get

away with only a short length of precious lowest loss coax cable.
I think the majority of customers are depending on compromising,
most favourable antenna-site versa reasonable length of downline.

USB might be popular and simple but cannot be first choice,
but USB, or USB with extenders and their variations are not at all failsafe.

I consider Ethernet connection more reliable than USB, especially when one has the box close to the antenna
and long downlead to PC-System. Very annoying when returning to an otherwise unattended system, only to find
that USB has dropped hours before.

Aurora Eurotech
Please do not omit an Ethernet connection

Klaus

Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2009, 10:08:46 PM »
... and give us a choice of TCP or UDP (the Xport can)

Thanks

*

MichaelWaddicor

  • *
  • 101
  • Aurora Eurotech
Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2009, 03:45:42 PM »

It is my guess that there is only a minority of customers who have an ideal antenna location and who do get

away with only a short length of precious lowest loss coax cable.
I think the majority of customers are depending on compromising,
most favourable antenna-site versa reasonable length of downline.

USB might be popular and simple but cannot be first choice,
but USB, or USB with extenders and their variations are not at all failsafe.

I consider Ethernet connection more reliable than USB, especially when one has the box close to the antenna
and long downlead to PC-System. Very annoying when returning to an otherwise unattended system, only to find
that USB has dropped hours before.

Aurora Eurotech
Please do not omit an Ethernet connection

Klaus

... and give us a choice of TCP or UDP (the Xport can)

Thanks

Having had many emails and requests regarding Ethernet I thought it would helpful to give some of the reasons for our specification decisions.

We looked into the market for Virtual Radar products and our conclusion was, that the main market opportunity was for a receiver with the following features :-
* Cost below ?300 including VAT.
* High performance receiver.
* Easy to install and use, ?plug and play.?
* Small as possible (Pocket sized).
* Open and easy to use interface for third party developers.
* Upgradable.
 
Adding Ethernet to this design would have had the following negative effects on the design :-
* The case would have to be bigger.
* The cost of the larger case / larger PCB and additional components would have pushed the cost over ?300.00.

However, I fully understand that Ethernet is important and this is why we are developing a Ethernet to USB adapter which will allow customers to easily upgrade their receivers.

It should be noted that this is NOT a cheap USB extender, it is a TRUE ?Ethernet Mini Server? and is suitable for operating the receiver at a remote site.
 
Being an existing (from 1993) Electronics design company gives us a lot of flexibility to introduce low volume products for niche markets at competitive prices.
You can be confident that we are listening to suggestions made via email and on the forums
and you can expect some interesting announcements over the next year, not just for Virtual Radar but other aviation related products.
 

Regards

Michael Waddicor
Aurora Eurotech

*

Anmer

  • *
  • 8369
  • Peterborough, UK
Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2009, 03:55:44 PM »
However, I fully understand that Ethernet is important and this is why we are developing a Ethernet to USB adapter which will allow customers to easily upgrade their receivers.

Well if it's as good as my trusty SBSnet device, it will be fine.  :D

*

max

Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2009, 12:49:53 AM »
I've never been one to keep the original case.  Back in the 80's I bought a Radio Shack PRO-30 handheld scanner.  The first thing I did, was throw the case away, use a propane torch on the CPU chip (till the solder melted on the pins) to get rid of it, and then solder some wires to a buffer chip and parallel port interface.  It was a crummy scanner before, and a great scanner after  >:D

Same with the SBS-1, I chucked the case about 10 days after I bought it, and sawed the receiver part of the board off.  The receiver belongs in the air, the computer belongs at your desk.

I've been using the 2" to 3" PVC pipe adapters, a short section of 3" pipe, and then a 3" cap.  This has a short section of 2" pipe at the bottom which is clamped to the tower or chimney. Leave the bottom open for condensation to run out, and use some foam on the inside to make a tight installation.

Bottom line, you can use cheap video coax down to your desk.

Maybe you need an OEM version for 200. That version comes with no case, and no antenna.  Two halves - one for up in the air, the other for near the computer, or better yet, an ethernet connection that has power over ethernet  :o

*

VK2GEL

Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2009, 02:23:28 AM »
Excellent post Max.

Offering a 'niche' populated PCB, splittable in the middle, would mean more sales to enthusiasts, and not detract from consumer version sales. I've got 4 1090MHz antennas now, don't need any more.

+1 for an OEM separatable version, no included antenna.

*

kdt1

  • *
  • 805
Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2009, 04:45:59 AM »
"ethernet connection that has power over ethernet"

                     Thats Perfect max
There and Back

*

GlynH

  • *
  • 141
Re: Ethernet output
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2009, 12:45:38 PM »
I certainly wouldn't want to buy it in 'kit' form or go about hacking mine about but I would definitely want the ethernet interface.

Thanks for the detailed explanation Michael but how about building in some sort of expansion bus/socket where those of us who want ethernet 'in the box' could pay the extra for the add-on ethernet module?

I understand the requirement & commercial pressures to keep the cost down but bearing in mind your list price is ?100 or more cheaper than the competition might give you some room to manouver?

Or maybe a 'Classic' & 'GT' version for increased cost leaving it to the customer to decide?

I for one would gladly pay the extra for ethernet but would probably stick with my ANRB if it was not a built-in option...but it will really be the software that will make or break the Aurora IMHO.

PoE would be ideal as then there would only be one cable to the box...

I am sick to the gills of add-on USB->Ethernet hardware & software and am considering buying the SBS-1 purely because of the built-in ethernet port.

Thanks & regards,
-=Glyn=-